New Year 2017

Merry Christmas Images, Wallpapers, Greetings Pictures 2016: Hey, guys we are planning to make this merry Christmas as you the biggest festival in your life as you all know Christmas have so many new surprises why to make it different from others months. Here we are going to share latest collection of Merry Christmas Images, Christmas Wallpapers and latest marry Christmas greeting pictures. We are sharing with the best and collected from all over the win to make your this Christmas more be beautiful or perfect in your life so you can be enjoyed every moment as a unique in all your friend’s circle. Also Checkout the best merry christmas Images , Merry Xmas images, Merry Xmas 2016 wallpapers and merry christmas quotes.

also check : - Happy New Year 2017 , Happy New Year 2017 Wishes

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If you guys looking for new stuff to make it new to all your relatives, family members, and your friends also then don’t worry we make it too simple for you by sharing lots of new pictures for your relatives, and for your girlfriends you can also share then with your family members also and lots of more things that you can share with your family members.

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happy friendship day 2016 whatsapp status

Happy Friendship Day 2016


Here we end for the most awaited day, Friendship day. Words are not enough to describe a friend that make our life easier and happier and filling the most mesmerizing memories with oneself. It’s said that the most beautiful relationship in the world is none but the Friendship, and here we are celebrating this day to dedicate to all our friends who are near or much far from our life.
Asking for any solution and they make us to forget the problems are “Friends”. Studying late night together and start talking about something weird is a “Friend”. Stuck in a traffic and the first person that comes in our mind for help is a “Friend”. Much more things are happening when we are in this most awesome relationship.
Friendship is what that gives meaning to life and provides the best direction for future. We all laugh, we cry and we learn with friends together. We eat, we shop and we work with friends together. And when we fight for what we believe and change the world, we do that with friends too.

Thus we celebrate this day to honor our most precious thing to be in our life and make something incredible.
Best Friend always sticks Together. ! So Friendship day is here! People search for friendship day quotes, Friendship day quotes for whatsapp, friendship day wishes and status to be shared on whatsapp, happy friendship day 2016 whatsapp status . we have shared some awesome collection of whatsapp one liner status for friendship day . check out out best and cooliest collection of Happy Friendship Day 2016 Quotes  , Happy Friendship Day 2016 status.

Happy Friendship Day 2016 Wishes Quotes

  • A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out. Happy Friendship Day!
  • How long shall v b friends? Do u want a clue? As long as stars twinkle in the sky, till the water runs dry & till the day I die. We will b friends. Happy Friendship Day 2016 Quotes!
  • Friendship is always a sweet responsibility, never an opportunity. Happy Friendship Day!
  • The rain may be falling hard outside, But your smile makes it all alright. I’m so glad that you’re my friend. I know our friendship will never end. Happy Friendship Day Dear !!!
  • She is a friend of my mind. She gathers me, man. The pieces I am, she gathers them and gives them back to me in all the right order.
  • A friend is someone who knows the song in your heart, and can sing it back to you when you have forgotten the words. Happy Friendship Day 2016 !
  • A friend is a push when you have stopped, a chat when u r lonely, a guide when u r searching, a smile when u r sad, a song when u r glad.
  • A single rose can be my garden… a single friend, my world. Happy Friendship Day!
  • Friendship is a strong and habitual inclination in two persons to promote the good and happiness of one another.
  • A true friend is someone who thinks that you are a good egg even though he knows that you are slightly cracked.
  • Don’t walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don’t walk behind me, I may not lead. Walk beside me and be my friend
  • Friends are like mango… you’ll never know which is sweet and which is not. Well, I’m lucky coz I was able to find the sweetest mango in U! Happy Friendship Day!
  • Sometimes being a friend means mastering the art of timing. There is a time for silence. A time to let go and allow people to hurl themselves into their own destiny. And a time to prepare to pick up the pieces when it’s all over.
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iPad deployment: Steps taken with first deployment

Notes reminding me of the steps taken at a very small deployment of 4 iPads at ATMS.

I prepared the dedicated iPad sync station by creating a new user account on the computer and logging in. This created a clean iTunes library for me to start with. In iTunes preferences I disabled automatic syncing of all devices and then disabled automatic backup of devices as well.

I downloaded the apps I wanted to include on all of the devices and synced them to what would become my master device. I then organized the apps using folders.
I learned that if a device password is set, it will not be restored to other iPads so this is something that could be set after the fact if desired.
I also learned that if a wireless configuration is set, it too would not be restored to other iPads, so it should be set after cloning is complete.
These are things that can be set more efficiently using configuration profiles created in iPhone configuration utility.
At this time I could configure settings for some apps on iPad. For example if I set the Firstclass server address, it would remain after a being cloned.
At this time you could configure any restrictions you wanted, but I am not sure if all of them would remain after being cloned. Perhaps it would be better to apply these settings with a configuration profile as profiles can easily be removed.
Once the master is ready I removed all old device backups in iTunes.
I now took a device backup of the master iPad in iTunes.

I then backed up all files needed to restore the itunes library should it become lost or changed.

I Restored backup to new device.
Renamed new device.
Applied configuration profiles.

I noticed though, that installing configuration profiles via the usb cable will cause iTunes to prompt for a password to encrypt the backup of the device the next time it is plugged into the sync station. This is because a configuration profile from iPhone configuration utility is signed & encrypted when installed via USB.
You can email an unsigned/unencrypted profile and install from Mail, or you can place this profile on a webserver and install via Safari. It will show as “Unverified”, but will not force encrypted iTunes device backups.
If you do choose to install the profiles via usb, you could provide a password to encrypt the password when prompted the first time and then check the box that remembers the password. Or you could manually set up the wireless configuration on each device and then connect to a web page that has the rest of your profiles and install them through safari.

These iPads were prepared as demos for the teachers. They were loaded with educational apps that focused on different topics, like math, science, and social studies. They will be passed around to different teachers for a few days so they can get a chance to play with them a little bit. Teachers are being instructed during this demo time not to plug the iPad into their own computer or the content could be erased.

When you sync an iPad to a computer, what is actually happening is that the iPad is syncing with the contents of one iTunes library. When you sync you are making the content of both devices the same. So in order to maintain the content on your iPad, the same content needs to exist in your iTunes library. If you take the iPad home and plug it into a different computer, with a different iTunes library that has different content and try to sync, iTunes will warn you that the device is synced to another library and that if you continue to sync you will replace the content on this iPad with the contents in this library, and thus removing content that is not common to both libraries. So to make it easy I just tell people that are using an iPad that is part of a set that was mass imaged, that it needs to be synced only with the original sync station, and individual users who set up and maintain their own iPad that they need to choose one computer to always sync with.

Now there are a few exceptions to the rule. If the iPad you have was set up on one computer and only has apps synced to it, you can plug it into another computer(your home computer for example) and adjust the app, photo, and book syncing options to allow you to sync your photos or books to the device without removing any apps. But if you then plug into another computer or back into the original sync station, and it is set to sync photos and books, the photos and books on your device will be replaced with the photos and books on that computer, and if the photo or book library is empty it will replace yours with an empty library, basically deleting everything. So while I sync my devices with multiple iTunes libraries it can be complicated and I usually just tell people it cant be done.
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iPad deployment: First school iPad deployment with iOS 5 step by step

Recently I have been doing a lot of research on what the workflow to deploy a number of iPads at a school would look like. I discovered there are lots of resources on the internet that focus on how they will be used in the classrooms, but there was not much that I was able to find on the best practices in the steps taken to prepare them for use. Based on some research, I put down on paper an order of steps that I thought made sense and worked on a small deployment of about 40 iPads. I learned a lot from that deployment and made some modifications to my plan. This week I worked on another deployment of 30 iPads running a beta of iOS 5 and a cart, where I was able to fine tune the steps that I was following. While there was a little back peddling and troubleshooting a few steps that did not go as well as I would have hoped, the following article describes the steps that did work well and the order in which I took them.

Step 1. Naming conventions. Through numerous discussions we decided that each device could be set up with a generic email account. These devices would be shared with different users throughout the day and the use of device based email would be an easy way for teachers to deliver materials to the devices and allow students to easily hand things back to the teacher or collaborate with other students. Also, because Canada does not have access to the App Store Volume Purchase Program from Apple yet, individual email addresses would be required to set up iTunes accounts for each device. So we registered a new domain with Google apps and set up 30 email accounts, one for each device. We then setup an email account for the site iPad admin, and a generic teacher email account.

Using these new accounts we created an iTunes account for the iPad admin using a school credit card for purchases, and 30 iTunes accounts using the 30 device based email addresses. These 30 iTunes accounts were setup with no credit card information. All purchases would be made by the ipadadmin iTunes account. Because you can only purchase an item once with an iTunes account, you could gift an app from the iPadadmin account to the 30 device accounts. This way we are not violating any license agreements and making sure that developers are getting paid for their hard work.

Later on when unpacking and setting up the devices, they will be labeled with the email address associated to that device and named the same as well.

While at this stage we also set up a mobile me account so we could use the “find my iPad” feature.

Step 2. The Bretford cart was unpacked and assembled. All of the iPads were unpacked, labeled, and placed into the cart. They were all powered on as they were placed in the cart to speed up the activation process.

Step 3. The sync station was set up. Because the school wanted to try out iOS 5, the beta of iTunes and the iOS were downloaded and installed on the laptop. In our case we are using a macbook pro as our sync station. We downloaded and installed Xcode and used it to upgrade the os on all of the device to iOS 5.

Step 4. One at a time, we plugged in each iPad to activate and register the devices. Having previously set up the ipadadmin iTunes account with the address of the school saved us a lot of time as we were able to pull this information from an existing apple id. The device was named and then the iTunes sync prefs for the device were set before moving on to the next device. Don’t be tempted to turn on wireless syncing at this time as it caused no end of headaches during other parts of this process.

Step 5. Configuration profiles. We decided that building a master iPad, backing it up and then restoring it to all the other devices did not gain us much, as many of the device settings we wanted would not actually transfer during a restore because they required a password or other authorization. We decided to focus our efforts on building configuration profiles for as many of these settings as we could and then manually setting those that we could not configure with a profile.

We created a single profile with the wireless network name and password, a single profile with a few restrictions, and then a profile for each email account; each device would receive its own profile.

Because you must interact with the device during the installation of a profile, installing them while plugged into the cart was cumbersome. I purchased a drink 7 port usb 2 hub for this purpose. I plugged 7 iPads into the hub, applied the wireless config profile to all of them, then like an assembly line, interacted with the screen on each iPad to complete the install. You must complete the install of the profile before a second profile can be added. Then the restriction profile was added to each of these 7, and finally the profile containing the email account for each device was installed. Earlier I warned you about enabling wireless syncing. I had enabled it and had duplicate devices showing up in the list of devices and had nothing but problems trying to apply profiles. It wasn’t until I turned it off that I was able to apply all the profiles without trouble.

Step 6. Because the configuration profiles were applied through usb, iTunes will force you to provide a password to encrypt each backup during the sync step. Once all of the iPads had their config profiles installed I plugged the iPads all back into the cart and synced each one, providing for each device when prompted, a password to encrypt the backup. At this point I enabled the wireless syncing option for each iPad in iTunes. After 1 more sync it would now sync wirelessly as long as it was plugged into power. The cart would now not need to be plugged into the sync station in order to sync with the iPads.

Step 7. Manual settings. There were a few settings that we had to do manually. We entered the mobile me account in the iCloud setup and enabled find my iPad. And we enabled auto downloads of purchased apps. During this process we downloaded ibooks, entered the ipadadmin account, and authorized the account with the 3 digit security code on the back of the original credit card used. Now when you purchased an app on the sync station, it would automatically download on all the iPads as long as they were connected to the internet.

Thats it. They are now ready for teachers and staff to decide what apps they will be installing on them. App placement and folders can be managed in iTunes and will be adjusted when synced.

UPDATE…We recently disabled automatic download of apps and books on all of the devices as it was too much of a strain on the network. This was discovered when a rather large app was selected for download and all thirty devices decided to download it as well at the same time.
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iPad deployment: Strategies

iPad deployment strategies.

There seem to be different strategies for iPad and iPod deployment.  One strategy that I hear about frequently is to build a master device that includes all the settings and content desired, then take a backup of the device and restore it’s backup to all of the other devices.

I tried this strategy at first with a small number of iPads. I think there were five. I configured wifi, installed a few apps, organized my screens, installed a couple configuration profiles, and set a few restrictions. I then performed a backup and restored it to another iPad.

I found the apps were reinstalled during the sync process but the locations of those apps were restored.

I found the wifi password was not saved and needed to be entered on the imaged device.  I also found that the configuration profiles that had been installed were not restored either. I can’t quite remember which one, but one of the settings set in restrictions was not restored.  These were things that I was now going to have to configure or reinstall on all the iPads that received this image.

Looking at what I gained from the backup/restore strategy I did not feel that it was worth the time an effort to pursue this option.  Also, the teachers using these iPads were probably going to be downloading and installing their own apps and content on a regular basis.

So below are the steps that I followed to deploy a small number of iPads, less than 50, in a “ready-for-you-to-fill-it-with-the-content-you-wish” setup.

Because I may be discussing more than one deployment strategy it makes sense to name them.  I am referring to this as a one-by-one deployment strategy.  After doing a few of these here are the steps that seemed to make sense to me.  This might not be the best deployment strategy but it is an option.

One-by-one Deployment Strategy

Setup a school ipad admin email account. This email account will be used to create the iTunes account that the school will use to purchase content.
Setup a unique email account for each device. This email account will be used as the hostname for the device, to apply for a no-credit-card iTunes account, and for device based email.  Because these devices will be shared with multiple users, we felt that unique generic email accounts on each device would easily allow teachers and students to collaborate with each other.  A teacher could easily email materials to all the iPad email accounts and students could email questions or finished assignments back to their teachers.
Setup iPad iTunes accounts. Use each device based email address to register for a unique no-credit-card iTunes account to be used for licensing applications and purchases where no access to volume purchasing is available.
Setup the iPad admin iTunes account. Use the ipad admin email account to register for an iTunes account to become known as the ipad admin itunes account.
Setup an iCloud account. This account will be used later  for the find my iPad functionality.
Unpack and assemble the syncing cart or station.
Unpack, label, and power up all the i-devices. Store in cart.
Setup dedicated sync station. Preferably Mac, create a second admin user to be used for syncing.  Download and install Xcode.
Upgrade IOS.  Using the cart or hub, update the OS on all devices using Xcode.
Activate and register devices. Individually activate, register, and name each device in iTunes.  Set the individual iTunes sync preferences for each device.  Do not enable wireless syncing at this time.  Return devices to cart.
Build and apply configuration profiles. Using a hub connect devices to computer and apply configuration profiles.  Right now I apply configuration profiles for wifi, restrictions, and email configurations.
Set device backup encryption password. Sync each device with iTunes once and provide a device backup encryption password when prompted by iTunes.  This is required when configuration profiles are applied via USB cable.
Apply manual settings. Build a list of settings that must be performed manually and perform them to all devices.  For example auto download of purchased apps, find my iPad, enrolling in profile manager etc…
If desired, enable wireless syncing. This needs to be set for each device in iTunes and is applied after a sync with device.  I am not sure if I like this option yet.


This has worked well to configure the devices and put them into the hands of the teachers.

But this weekend I stumbled upon something while reading another iPad deployment document at pineglen.info. The writer there suggests encrypting the backup before restoring as this will save any passwords you entered during the building of your master.

So I tried a little experiment today. I took an iPad, joined it to the wifi network, and installed a configuration profile through USB. The backup was already encrypted as you are prompted for this if your configuration profiles are installed through USB. I took a backup and restored it to a freshly erased iPad. The wifi password was retained, the iTunes account was still logged in, and the locations of the apps were retained after they were reinstalled but none of the configuration profiles were restored.

If using this restore strategy, is it better to configure and include as many of the settings as possible locally on the device before the backup so they can be included in the restore, or is it better to perform these after the restore using configuration profiles.

I am now going to do a little experimenting and try to come up with a set of working steps for a backup/restore deployment strategy and will post my steps and perhaps discuss some of the differences between the two.

Backup/restore Deployment Strategy : This is a work in progress.  I have done some testing with a couple of devices but will get a chance to try this out with 30 devices soon.

Setup a school ipad admin email account. This email account will be used to create the iTunes account that the school will use to purchase content.
Setup a unique email account for each device. This email account will be used as the hostname for the device, to apply for a no-credit-card iTunes account, and for device based email.  Because these devices will be shared with multiple users, we felt that unique generic email accounts on each device would easily allow teachers and students to collaborate with each other.  A teacher could easily email materials to all the iPad email accounts and students could email questions or finished assignments back to their teachers.
Setup iPad iTunes accounts. Use each device based email address to register for a unique no-credit-card iTunes account to be used for licensing applications and purchases where no access to volume purchasing is available.
Setup the iPad admin iTunes account. Use the ipad admin email account to register for an iTunes account to become known as the ipad admin itunes account.
Setup an iCloud account. This account will be used later  for the find my iPad functionality or any other iCloud functions desired.
Unpack and assemble the syncing cart or station.
Unpack, label, and power up all the i-devices. Store in cart.
Setup dedicated sync station. Preferably a Mac so multiple devices can be synced at the same time. With Windows syncing any more than one at a time is reported as being problematic. Create a separate admin user to be used for syncing.  The sync station should be a dedicated machine and not used as a workstation. Download and install Xcode to be able to upgrade the os on multiple iPads at the same time.  iTunes configuration considerations: Disable “check for new software updates automatically” as if there is an update it will be displayed for each device connected, if automatic backups of the iPads are not required each time the iPads are connected then you can disable them from terminal using the following command “defaults write com.apple.iTunes AutomaticDeviceBackupsDisabled -bool true”.
Build master device. Update IOS on your master device. Download and install apps through iTunes.  Organize apps through iTunes or on device.  Configure device and application settings.  It appears as though settings and passwords will be retained during a restore as long as the device backup was encrypted.  Things to consider including: Wifi password, iCloud login for find my ipad, store account login information, shortcut to your mdm server. etc…(Restrictions could also be set here but can also be set using ipcu or Lion profile manager.  With profile manager these settings could be more easily managed at a later time.)
Take encrypted backup of master. Once a backup of your master iPad has been taken, you can store a copy of this in another location in case it needs to be used again.  It is located in ~/Library/Application Support/MobileDevice/Backup.  Perhaps a designated folder on the computer can be used to store a copy.
Upgrade IOS on recipients. Using the cart or hub, update the OS on all devices using Xcode if possible.
Activate, register, Restore and sync recipient devices. Individually activate, register, and restore each device in iTunes.  Rename the unit.  Set the individual iTunes sync preferences for each device.  Set the iPad backup to encrypted.  For large rollouts it may be desirable to separate the activation and sync tasks to increase workflow efficiency.  iTunes can be run in activation only mode to allow activations from a computer other than the dedicated sync station.
If available enroll all devices into Lion Profile Manager for device management. Using the shortcut to your mdm server you created in step 9, download the trust cert and enroll the device in Lion profile manager.  Set group configurations as well as device configurations.
Apply any device based configurations to individual devices. Because we are using device based email accounts, each device has a different account that needs to be configured.  Configuring with iPhone configuration utility will allow you to perform this quickly as profiles can be duplicated quickly and modified, but you won’t be able to remotely manage this in the future as you can with profile manager, but with profile manager each device email must be built manually one by one as far as I can tell.


I think this second strategy will now work well.  Cloning the devices is now a little more streamlined and I have been able to cut out the need to use the iPhone configuration utility as well as lower the amount of steps I would need to perform manually on each device.  I will see how it goes and update the strategy.
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iPad deployment: Backup/restore deployment strategy and steps

After months of research and a handful of iPad deployments, I have written the following document detailing the steps I now follow to deploy iPads in schools.

Backup/restore Deployment Strategy: step-by-step

Setup a school ipad admin email account. This email account will be used to create the iTunes account that the school will use to purchase content.
Setup a unique email account for each device. This email account will be used as the hostname for the device, to apply for a no-credit-card iTunes account, and for device based email.  Because these devices will be shared with multiple users, we felt that unique, generic, email accounts on each device would easily allow teachers and students to collaborate with each other.  A teacher could easily email materials to all the iPad email accounts, and students could email questions or finished assignments back to their teachers.
Setup iPad iTunes accounts. Use each device based email address to register for a unique no-credit-card iTunes account to be used for licensing applications and purchases where no access to volume purchasing is available.
Setup the iPad admin iTunes account. Use the ipad admin email account to register for an iTunes account to become known as the ipad admin itunes account.  Apps can be gifted to iPad iTunes accounts.
Setup an iCloud account. This account will be used later for iCloud features like “Find my iPad”.  You could also use the school iPad admin account instead of creating a new account.
Unpack and assemble the syncing cart or station.
Unpack, label, and power up all the i-devices. Store in cart. Powering up the devices now, saves time later when they are connected to the sync station as you don’t have to wait the minute for them to boot up.
Setup dedicated sync station. Preferably a Mac, as multiple devices can be synced at the same time. With Windows, it is widely reported that syncing any more than one at a time is problematic.  Make sure you are using the latest version of iTunes. Create a second admin user to be used for syncing.  The sync station should be a dedicated machine; not used as a workstation. iTunes configuration considerations: Disable “check for new software updates automatically” as if there is an update it will be displayed for each device connected, if automatic backups of the iPads are not required each time the iPads are connected then you can disable them from terminal using the following command “defaults write com.apple.iTunes AutomaticDeviceBackupsDisabled -bool true”.
Build master device. Rename the device in iTunes to something outside of your regular naming convention and recognizable like “student iPad master” or something similar. Update IOS on your master device. Download and install desired apps using iTunes on your sync station so they are all included in your library.  On your device or in iTunes, organize your screens and configure settings.  For more details on the settings I include please see the section titled “Settings”, at the end of this document.
Take encrypted backup of master. Once you have your master iPad perfect, take a backup of it but make sure it is encrypted.  Encrypting your backup saves many of the usernames and passwords you entered during the building of your master iPad. You can store a copy of this in another location in case it needs to be used again.  It is located in ~/Library/Application Support/MobileDevice/Backup.  Perhaps a designated folder on the computer can be used to store a copy.  Once I am done with the master I temporarily disable automatic syncing of devices in the preferences to keep devices from syncing after registration and activation.  Don’t forget to turn it back on later.
Activate, register, Restore, Restore from backup,  and sync recipient devices. Here is the workflow I follow to actually clone the iPads.  I plug in one iPad to the sync station or hub.  It shows up in iTunes and prompts me to activate and register the device.  I enter the school iPad admin account to register the device.  If there is an iOS update available I then click the restore button from the summary screen in iTunes to upgrade.  Upgrading this way won’t bother with a backup.  Once the restore upgrade is complete, the device reboots, then I perform a restore from backup on the device in iTunes choosing the backup of your master.  The device will reboot once more when this is complete.  At this time, if you are quick enough to be able to do it before the device starts to sync, you can rename the device, but I don’t do it at this time.  Now the device will start to sync all of the apps.  While this is happening you can start on the next iPad.  While you can sync many devices at the same time, you can only upgrade or restore one at a time.  I found that if i tried to hurry things along I would get upgrade failures or restore failures, so I recommend completing the steps to upgrade and restore one iPad before moving onto the next.  Let it finish its second reboot and start syncing before moving onto the next one.  Because you can now interact with the device while it is syncing you can name it and enroll it to your mdm while it is syncing.  If your are using a cart you may not have the slack in your cables to do this but if you are using a hub you might be able to.  Because I have been using carts I wait for them all to finish syncing, and then since I have to interact with them to enroll in the profile manager anyway, rename them then, and then enroll.  For large rollouts it has been suggested to separate the activation and sync tasks to increase workflow efficiency.  iTunes can be run in activation only mode to allow activations from a computer other than the dedicated sync station.
If available enroll all devices into Lion Profile Manager for device management. Using the shortcut to the mdm server I created in step 9, install the trust cert and enroll the device in Lion profile manager.  In Lion Profile manager I organize the devices into groups and can then set profiles all members of a group as well as individual devices.  The first profile for the group included the wifi setup to replace the existing manual setup.  Other profiles like restrictions can be applied to the group as a whole.  Settings that are unique to each device, like email accounts can be set per device as well.
Reset your iTunes preference for automatic syncing.  Now when you download apps to install, simply unplug and replug in your cart and all your iPads will sync.
Settings

The following are settings that are retained after an encrypted backup is restored on another device.  I like to include some of these settings in my master to decrease the amount of time spent configuring devices after they are cloned.

Wifi SSID and password.
iCloud login password and settings. At this time the only iCloud service I like to enable is the “Find My iPad” service.
iTunes store username, password and auto download settings. I have run into the following issues with the auto download setting:  after enabling books on more than 10 devices, I have been presented with an error informing me of this, purchasing large apps like garage band can bring a network to a halt when you have many devices on it configured to auto download apps.
MDM server shortcut in Safari. This makes joining your Lion Profile Manager server very quick.
Email account settings. Because we are using device based email accounts on many of our devices, we need to configure them after cloning.  These are just generic numbered accounts like abssipad01@domain.com.  I found it easy to setup the one account on the master and then just change the 01 in the account to the correct number for that iPad after it was cloned.
Restrictions. The 4 digit password to get into restrictions is retained.  The only restriction I enable locally is to disable delete apps.  Any other restrictions can be managed through profiles.
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How wealth managers manage their own wealth

Private bankers are guiding their rich clients into safer investments as financial market turmoil spreads, but when it comes to their own money they often take a different tack.
“I don’t have a very well diversified portfolio,” admits Timothy Vaill, chairman and chief executive officer of Boston Private Financial Holdings , which owns 15 independently operated financial services firms.
“The majority of my investments are in my own company,” he told this week’s Reuters Wealth Management Summit.
“And I invested additionally this quarter in my own company again because I really believe what we are doing is the right thing to do and it is a very strong company. And I’m there all day, every day, watching it like a hawk.”
David Lamere, chief executive of The Bank of New York Mellon’s wealth management unit, said his money is managed by his own company.
“I’m a big shareholder in BNY Mellon, and the rest of my assets is managed by our organization,” Lamere told the Reuters Summit. But his investments were “very diversified”, he added.
How much do they own?
According to Thomson Reuters data, Vaill owned 201,794 shares of Boston Private as of mid-August valued at about $1.8 million. As of Thursday afternoon, his stake would have retained its value at $1.8 million.
Vaill also said he does not borrow against his stock and does not invest in hedge funds.
Lamere owned 255,820 shares of Bank of New York Mellon as of May 9, valued then at about $11 million. As of Thursday afternoon, that was notionally valued at about $7.5 million.
Lamere said he was at a lunch on Sept. 18 when Bank of New York Mellon stock briefly fell 35 percent along with a slump in shares of other trust banks and asset managers.
“It all happened within about an hour in the middle of the day and I was in a lunch. I got called six times,” Lamere added.
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